Wednesday, September 02, 2009

[crossbows] home defence weapon of choice


Yes, yes, Agincourt, when England's finest took out the Froggies with the noble longbows and so on ... the longbow is a wondrous thing but there's something about the crossbow I've always liked and when it comes down to it, as far as I can understand, it's still legal over here for home defence - correct me if I'm wrong.

Now, a number of these, primed and bolted to the bannisters and assorted woodwork around the house, strategically aimed, would be a quite effective disposer and disperser of the dreaded intruders - they wouldn't know where the next bolt was coming from as they ventured through the house and the best thing - they're near silent so you never have any ammo problems.

Of course, when we come for the Westminster pollies and the BofE chiefs, the longbow would probably be the better choice - more easily carried and quicker to utilize but I was talking about home defence really.

15 comments:

  1. "...the longbow would probably be the better choice - more easily carried..."

    Eh..? I've seen some, and they are huge. The little 'pistol grip' crossbows are easier to conceal, surely?

    And don't require as much strength to use, either, I think?

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  2. Good to see you thinking this way. I hadn't really thought of the pistol grip ones. Thing is, we have to lure Gordo and Lord Evil out first.

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  3. the crossbow, chic and deadly...have a friend who hunts bears in Alaska with one. :/

    but I thought your home defense laws were not much other than the right to run away? That it would be vigilantism, or something...

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  4. I think Sackers put it succinctly, HGF. Lockholes for him.

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  5. I suppose a truncated fowling piece is out of the question? Less chance of a miss when compared to a single bolt. ;)

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  6. Did you know that you can buy a machine gun that fires shotgun cartridges? A wall of lead: ouch!

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  7. Truncated fouling piece eh?

    Machine shot gun?

    We're progressing here, chaps.

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  8. I was once visiting a retail unit where the manager was a keen long bowman. The good old fashioned one without pulleys.
    He happened to be demonstrating the technique for sighting when a bloke outside grabbed a woman's bag and ran up Sutton high street.
    The archer quickly fastened an arrow and in all seriousness asked me if he should let him have it.
    " I won't miss. He is running uphill, he's fat and I'm very good. He wont die. These are practice arrows."

    Naturally I couldn't allow it, but I always wished that I had.

    Someone else just punched the fat theif and he went over a railing.
    All very satisfying.

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  9. I'd have let him, to see if he had the range and had aimed for the wind factor.

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  10. LOL. In a country where calling him a thieving bastard would get you put in jail how come you think you can shoot him with a potentially lethal weapon?

    Best to shoot him and just discard the body. Try and remember all the tips you get from CSI and Bones about leaving trace evidence. I'm sure he doesn't leave a list of where he is going to rob tonight so if its only you that knows you should be OK. If more than you knows then you better cough up or their conscience will get you in trouble later. You must remember you had no intention of hurting him but it went off in the struggle. It goes better in court.

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  11. Section 31 of the Offences Against The Person Act 1861 remains in force:

    http://www.opsi.gov.uk/RevisedStatutes/Acts/ukpga/1861/cukpga_18610100_en_2#pb3-l1g26

    This is the part that the closed shop Law and Order clique don't want people to know about: "Provided also, that nothing in this section shall be deemed to make it unlawful to set or place, or cause to be set or placed, or to be continued set or placed, from sunset to sunrise, any spring gun, man trap, or other engine which shall be set or placed, or caused or continued to be set or placed, in a dwelling house, for the protection thereof."

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  12. Thank you very much for that. That's iniquitous.

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  13. Inside your home, there is a lot to be said for a baseball bat, depending on the person and the legalities. Here where I live, I keep a 1911 handy, since it's legal for me to do so.

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  14. In Las Vegas, it is unlawful to pursue and kill a man who has held you under lethal force if you kill him beyond 20 miles distant from the crime. That is considered excessive vigilance.

    Just in case anyone gets to visiting.

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