Thursday, May 07, 2009

[illegal immigrants] why post when someone already has

Deogolwulf can be slightly inaccessible at times to those without that sort of mind but this is one everyone can comprehend:

Illegal immigrants gathered openly in Trafalgar Square yesterday to protest against the “injustice” of not being British citizens, and yet for some reason they were not rounded up and put into camps ready for deportation. Still, I suppose the sight of the authorities taking seriously the integrity of the country and its laws might scare the voters away, millions of whom haven’t even arrived yet.

15 comments:

Matt said...

"...the “injustice” of not being British citizens" I heard about this. This is what liberalism, 50 years of PC, and the "right" to emigrate have gotten us. I feel so bad for you all across the Atlantic. Man, we're not much better off here, with over 30 million (by accurate counts). If it could be done under Eisenhower in the '50s with Operation: Wetback, it can be done again. I would hope in the UK it would be easier, considering your smaller geographic area. However, having seen how the government is so "tolerant" of ordinary Britons and how it kowtows to invaders, I am not holding my breath.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

I spent Saturday night in a train carriage with someone who thought the illegals coming here should be shot at in their boats!

Wolfie said...

Life in Britain 2009 is looking more like some real bad acid trip every day.

UBERMOUTH said...

I dunno-I think immigrants enrich our lives. Think how dull we'd be if everyone in Britain was British,America- American.
It's like we get a little taste of every culture without having to leave home.

People complain about immigrants because they falsely assume they cripple any country's economy taking hand outs-when there are far more 'natives' dependant on the taxpayer. Immigrants will take on job conditions /wages natives often won't.They spend in our countries/pay taxes,thus do contribute.

If we could get beyond the racism and give them equal respect & opportunity based on merit,we'd all be a lot happier and richer for their existence and input in our countries.

UBERMOUTH said...

I just realized something....I have lived in Chinatown, been familiar with Little Italy & Greece, was quite familiar with the Muslim and black community. I live amongst what is considered the 'posh' element and I've never been so stifled, miserable and agog at the lowly morals of my neighbours. We don't have one immigrant here,but it'd be nicer if we did....I'm the immigrant-and I was BORN here.

Matt said...

If I may retort (having spent an extended amount of time in a foreign country before), countries are the way they are because of their natives. You change the kind of people brought into a country, you change the country (for better or for worse, as seems to be the case nowadays). That's not racist, that just is. It can even, shall I dare fancy the idea, be applied to an area of a country and within one race. There are plenty of whites I know that if brought to my part of America would mess it up in a heartbeat.

Martin said...

James,

I am currently reading Niall Ferguson's 'The War Of the World'. You may have reached the stage of glazing over as soon as I mention the great doctor and master's name; but he is absolutely on the ball when describing what happens to some peoples' minds once they decide to put others in camps. One can find much to agree with in what the blogger you have linked to has to say about both that demonstration and the mentality that animated it, but deportation camps? Never.

UBERMOUTH said...

It's not the people who change the country, or their presence at least, it's the lack of assimilation.Having said that though, how much is their unwillingness as opposed to our not wanting them, too?

I do believe in 'when in Rome...' so there's a need to balance keeping their culture to some extent,but not cross the line inflicting their culture/laws/beliefs onto us,in an attempt to turn their adopted country into a home away from home.

I think this is what fundamentally creates resentment and racial tensions. Of course, a country can only absorb so much immigration.

Does America consider itself multicultural, Matt?

James Higham said...

Matt - geographic area makes it mor difficult in some ways.

Welshcakes - it is a prevailing opinion in Italy.

Wolfie - I really can't comment, ha ha.

Uber - I take your point [maybe it should be the other way round] but I also see Matt's statement that it is the natives who should make the country what it is.

Martin - fair enough.

Matt said...

UBERMOUTH, good question! It depends on whom you ask. I for one tend to believe that there are sub-cultures within America, as there are in any country. That in and of itself does not make it multicultural.

James, this is true. Thanks for reminding me. I would like to point out too that it's not an absolute rule that people make the place. It has to do with your upbringing too (when I say your, I mean on an aggregate scale, not an individual scale, as to use an individual example for the aggregate would be data mismatching, thank you polisci 300!), such as two parents families, religion/absence thereof, etc. I'm not saying individually that a person can not be successful with only one parent or without religion but it makes it harder, don't ya think?

Deogolwulf said...

Martin,

"[B]ut deportation camps? Never."

It seems you find something objectionable in the very idea of deportation-camps per se. Might I enquire as to the nature of that objection?

Yours,
D.

UBERMOUTH said...

Matt- I spent mnay years living in Canada which does consider itself mutli cultural. I think it's a mindset more that an immgiration stat.

I lived in Greek town when I was younger and my first crush was a guy named Andy Papadopolis- what a mouthful.I used to love is name.

I found the various cultures I've known intimately through friends and lovers have been a incredible experience.They are, on the whole, welcoming, friendly and warm.

I am not suggesting you are racist- I do have a big problem with say the Muslim community insisting Christian prayers not be allowed in school or one can't say Christmas' whilst they insist on us respecting their religion/culture.They have to embrace a new culture not redefine it.

I was married to a foreigner and all he did was moan about all what was wrong with Canada and better about his country. My response was 'Then go home!'

So many of the foods and goods we have now grown accustomed to were introduced by foreigners that we would never hve had access to.

Martin said...

"It seems you find something objectionable in the very idea of deportation-camps per se. Might I enquire as to the nature of that objection?"

You may. It's waht the Nazis and the Soviets did to people they wanted to do away with. We should be better than that. Simplistic, but true.

Deogolwulf said...

“It’s waht the Nazis and the Soviets did to people they wanted to do away with.”

Really? Nazi and Soviet camps? I’d never heard of them until you mentioned them. Weren’t they any good?

I am of course joking with you. But you still haven’t answered my question: what do you find objectionable in the very idea of deportation-camps per se? I myself can find nothing in the idea of deportation-camps per se that necessarily precludes jolly picnics and sports-day frolics, and so if someone should recoil in horror at the merest mention thereof, I am interested in what that person has imputed to it, how that person conceives it, and whether he is able to resist the thought-destroying usurpation of denotation by connotation. Furthermore, I am interested in whether that person can resist imputing his own fixed idea to other persons.

Martin said...

Deogulwulf,

As the late Frankie Howerd would have said,

'OOOOHHH!!!!

OOOOOOOOOOOHHHHHHHHH!!!'

Being rather more interested in the soteriological than the dialectical these days, I find the idea of herding humans into pens a bit, well, inhumane. After all, just about the only jolly sports day frolic that seems to go on in our detention centres at the moment is synchronised eyelid-sewing.

The most bloody godawful dangerous element within any society is always its intellectuals, don't you think?